Khairete! Em Hotep! Salaam!

Welcome to the Summer Solstice 2014 issue of Eternal Haunted Summer! In celebration of the season, here is “Kupala Night (Divination with the Wreath)” by Simon Kozhin.

kupala

Our Poetry section contains a number of new authors, as well as returning favorites. “Brigid’s Fire” and “Lugh” by Shauna Aura Knight draw from Celtic lore, while SR Hardy’s epic “The Chaining of Loki” is inspired by ancient Norse mythology. Michael Routery culls Mediterranean history and myth for “Cyparissus” and “Venus Felix and Roma,” while Russ Cope — in his EHS debut — sits down for a “Dinner with Dionysus.” Steven Wittenberg Gordon, MD, offers up a series of “Haiku-Like Poems Inspired by Greek Mythology,” as well as a Greek reimagining of “Snow White.” Shoshana Edelberg sings of the Goddess in “Her Many Faces,” and examines the myth of Persephone in “The Pomegranate.” The desert landscape of the American West inspires “Holy Ghost Petroglyph, Utah” by Rebecca Bailey, while Middle Eastern lore inspires her “Lilith.” Apollo walks a “Hostile Country” in Sandi Liebowitz’ poem, while a mournful tone suffuses “In the Tomb of Diana” by Hillary Lyon. WC Roberts returns to EHS with two MesoAmerican pieces: “Itzel’s Repast” and “Wayob.” JD deHart makes his EHS debut with his own “Lilith,” as does Marie Kane with “Persephone Seeks Soft Fur of Bees.” William Morrow also makes his debut with “Ram-Headed Serpent,” as does Alyson Adler with her Sappho-inspired “Untitled (Fragment 105B).” Alicia Cole turns to the natural world for inspiration in “Song for Otter,” while Caitlin Johnson makes her first appearance with the Norse-inspired “Wednesday.”

In Fiction, Gary D Aker returns with the magical, meditative “Fir Goddess/Fire Goddess.” Jolene Dawe brings Hera and Zeus into the modern world in “Hieros Gamos,” while Edward Ahern returns with the Egyptian-inspired “The Keepsake.” Gods deal with Saint Patrick’s Day in “No Green Beer” by Juli D Revezzo, while Victoria Harkavy — in her first appearance in EHS — explores the fate of a contemporary “Narcissus.” Finally, an intrigue-riddled court in the ancient Middle East is the setting for Kristin Roahrig’s debut, “The Plague Queen.”

In Essays, Erin Lale tackles Norse myth and the modern world in “Asgard as a Multi-Racial Society,” then turns to women and self-acceptance in “Getting to Phuket: Body Image, Nudity, and Getting Comfortable in My Skin.” Tahni J Nikitins continues her reimaginings/analysis of Norse myth, this time from the point of view of Angrboda, in “Bindings IV: Far Away,” while Shirl Sazynski returns to EHS with her meditation on the myth of Osiris and Isis in “Honey and Acacia.”  Finally, Russ Cope offers a brief overview of the relationship between “Mythology and Comic Books.”

In the Interviews section, we sit down with Erzabet Bishop, co-author of Elemental Passions and author of Sigil Fire; Rhavensfyre, co-authors of Elemental Passions and Ladysmith; and Michael Routery, author of From the Prow of Myth. Erzabet Bishop herself interviews Tony McKormack of the phenomenal British goth/Pagan band, Inkubus Sukkubus.

Finally, in Reviews, Erin Lale delves into A Cop’s Guide to Occult Investigations: Understanding Satanism, Santeria, Wicca, and Other Alternative Religions by Tony M Kail and Embracing Heathenry by Larisa Hunter. The Devil Is a Gentleman: Exploring America’s Religious Fringe by JC Hallman is the subject of Jolene Dawe’s review, while EHS editor  Rebecca Buchanan looks at the fantasy anthology The Right Bitch Trio by Doranna Durgin. Erin Lale also looks at the post-modernist myth Right Here, Right Now by Garman Lord, while TJ O’Hare digs into the juvenile fantasy novel The Thickety: A Path Begins by JA White.

As always, enjoy!

1 Comment

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One response to “Khairete! Em Hotep! Salaam!

  1. Thank you very much for this posting. I was looking out for some related literature and I am very excited to follow your recommendations! This may keep me busy for quite some time.

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